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Cellular vs. PCS

Personal Communications Services (PCS) is a wireless phone service very similar to cellular phone service, but with an emphasis on personal service and extended mobility. The term “PCS” is often used in place of “digital cellular,” but true PCS means that other services like paging, caller ID and e-mail are bundled into the service.

While cellular was originally created for use in cars, PCS was designed from the ground up for greater user mobility. PCS has smaller cells and therefore requires a larger number of antennas to cover a geographic area. PCS phones use frequencies between 1.85 and 1.99 GHz (1850 MHz to 1990 MHz).

Technically, cellular systems in the United States operate in the 824-MHz to 894-MHz frequency bands; PCS operates in the 1850-MHz to 1990-MHz bands. And while it is based on TDMA, PCS has 200-kHz channel spacing and eight time slots instead of the typical 30-kHz channel spacing and three time slots found in digital cellular.

Now let’s look at the distinction between “dual band” and “dual mode” technologies

 


 

Dual Band vs. Dual Mode
If you travel a lot, you will probably want to look for phones that offer dual band, dual mode or both. Let’s take a look at each of these options:

  • Dual band – A phone that has dual-band capability can switch frequencies. This means that it can operate in both the 800-MHz and 1900-MHz bands. For example, a dual-band TDMA phone could use TDMA services in either an 800-MHz or a 1900-MHz system.
  • Dual mode – In cell phones, “mode” refers to the type of transmission technology used. So, a phone that supported AMPS and TDMA could switch back and forth as needed. It’s important that one of the modes is AMPS — this gives you analog service if you are in an area that doesn’t have digital support.
  • Dual band/Dual mode – The best of both worlds allows you to switch between frequency bands and transmission modes as needed.

Changing bands or modes is done automatically by phones that support these options. Usually the phone will have a default option set, such as 1900-MHz TDMA, and will try to connect at that frequency with that technology first. If it supports dual bands, it will switch to 800 MHz if it cannot connect at 1900 MHz. And if the phone supports more than one mode, it will try the digital mode(s) first, then switch to analog.

Sometimes you can even find tri-mode phones. This term can be deceptive. It may mean that the phone supports two digital technologies, such as CDMA and TDMA, as well as analog. But it can also mean that it supports one digital technology in two bands and also offers analog support. A popular version of the tri-mode type of phone for people who do a lot of international traveling has GSM service in the 900-MHz band for Europe and Asia and the 1900-MHz band for the United States, in addition to the analog

 

 

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